The findings of the annual WebAIM Million report has been published. The 2022 findings show some growth in web accessibility…and that we still have a long way to go.

According to WebAIM:

This annual accessibility analysis of the home pages of the top one million web sites provides insight into the current state of and trends for web accessibility. The report provides details into technical aspects of accessibility and comparisons for many types of home page characteristics, such as by top-level domain, document language, site category/sector, and technologies in use. The WAVE web accessibility testing tool was used to analyze the 1,000,000 home pages.

Among the highlights – the Good News and Bad News:

Good News

  • The number of detectable accessibility errors was 50.8 on average per home page. This was a minor improvement from 51.4 errors one year ago.
  • 96.8% of home pages had detectable WCAG 2 failures. This was a small improvement from 97.4% in 2021 and 98.1% in 2020.
  • The proper use of headings in home pages is increasing over time.
  • ARIA usage has nearly doubled in two years, with 75% of home pages utilizing ARIA and an average of 60 ARIA attributes per home page.

Bad News

  • Home pages most commonly had low contrast text, missing alternative text, empty links, missing form input labels, empty buttons, and missing document language. 96.5% of all errors detected fall into these six categories.
  • 23% of images had missing alternative text. Over one third of all images analyzed had detectable accessibility issues.
  • 39% of the 4.4 million form inputs detected were not properly labeled.
  • ARIA usage has nearly doubled in two years, with 75% of home pages utilizing ARIA and an average of 60 ARIA attributes per home page. Home pages with ARIA present averaged 70% more detectable errors (23 additional potential barriers per page) than those without ARIA. An increase in ARIA attributes aligned with an increase in detectable web accessibility errors.
  • There were significant differences in detectable accessibility errors based on top-level domain. For example, .ru (Russia) and .cn (China) home pages had around double the errors as .us (United States) and .ca (Canada) home pages. Similar differences were detected for various page languages.
  • The presence of most popular JavaScript frameworks, libraries, and web frameworks corresponded with an increase in detectable errors.

Read the whole report on the WebAIM website.